I happen to be undergoing some dental adventures whilst starting up this effort, so there is a certain amount of frustration at what I can accomplish in a day.

Lining up some initial study resources is on today's list.

1/  My Rails is rustier than I like.  I can certainly puzzle things out, but I want it to be instinctual.  

So – working through the latest version of  The Ruby on Rails Tutorial  by Michael Hartl is a good first step to identifying the pieces I need to work on first.

2/  I am not passionate about the aesthetic side of web development (I know,  I'm an artist.  I contain multitudes, you see.)  I'm more of a back end person,  So I've never gotten awesome at it.    

However, I early-adopted on  Josh Comeau's  CSS for Javascript developer's course  – I've dipped my toes in, and it's really pretty good so far – there are definitely things I didn't know in the first couple of lessons.

3/ All things GitHub/GitLab.  I (mostly) do my git through an IDE (RubyMine for Rails work).  My volunteer work uses GitHub, and I want to not have to scratch my head when it comes to doing code reviews, etc.   So GitHub is prioritized over GitLab (even though IIRC, there are some good reasons for preferring the latter).

Where to start?  At the GitHub learning resources page.

4/  PostgreSQL.   I'm pretty fluent in relational database – I 'grew up' using MS SQL Server – and since I live with a former Sybase DBA, I can get help with thorny SQL issues– but being comfortable with all the admin tasks, etc is a good idea.

Since I live in Toronto, I have access to a lot of O'Reilly's publications through the Toronto Public Library.  I'm going to start with "PostgreSQL: Up and Running, 3rd Edition" by Regina Obe and Leo Hsu.  It has a good overlap of recency, likely relevance, and good reviews.

5/ I also want to brush up on all the magic around getting things pushed to production.   I don't think that's my first priority, oddly.   It will also be touched on in the Rails tutorial above.